Tag Archives: Our Achievements

ArchSoc’s Trip to Port Arthur

A few weeks have passed since the Flinders Archaeological Society (ArchSoc) sent six of our members and two of our committee to help the Port Arthur Historic Sites Management Authority (PAHSMA) with their artefact collection from the 2011 Hobart Penitentiary Chapel excavations.

From left to right- Back: David Roe, Jeanne Harris, Tom Lally, Ilona Bartsch, Maxim Ayres and Louisa Fischer. Front: Andrew Wilkinson, Leah Ralph, Annita Waghorn, Lauren Davison and Holly Winter.

As you can see from the blog entries that the participants wrote at the end of each day, everyone enjoyed themselves and learnt a lot. This is the first time ArchSoc has organised a field trip like this and it is a testament to the dedication and organisation of this year’s committee that the trip went off without a hitch.

On behalf of ArchSoc, I would like to thank those that helped make this trip possible from the onset. Thanks go to Claire Smith, whose networking made this possible, Natalie Bittner, who along with myself, conducted the initial consultations with PAHSMA, and to David Roe and Annita Waghorn from PAHSMA, who were both more than happy to host several student volunteers.

BBQ in the Plaza @ Flinders

I would also like to thank those that helped in the planning stages and those that helped us in our more-than-successful fundraising BBQ and Bake Sale including the ArchSoc Committee and staff from the Department of Archaeology. There are too many individuals to name, but you all know who you are.

Thanks to everyone that applied to go on this trip, sorry we couldn’t accommodate all of you and to Andrew Wilkinson and Tom Lally who co-ordinated the trip at short notice when it was clear that I could no longer attend.

Lastly, a very big thank you goes to Jeanne Harris, David Roe and Annita Waghorn from PAHSMA for hosting ArchSoc on what was a very successful trip. We hope this is the start of a long relationship.

Bake Sale in the Humanities Courtyard

The professionalism of our committee and participants is highlighted in an email that David Roe sent to me shortly after the trip:

“From our perspective the week was a great success: we were able to get a number of important fieldwork jobs done and a significant hole has been made in the cataloguing task for the Penitentiary Chapel assemblage.  Jeanne, Annita and I were impressed with the Flinders contingent: they worked hard and were a pleasure to have around.  Their enthusiasm and conduct reflects most admirably upon the Flinders ArchSoc in particular and the University in general.  Please accept our thanks for having organised and underwritten the trip; we look forward to more such visits in the future.”

Again, thanks to all involved!

Jordan Ralph

President, Flinders Archaeological Society

Sorting artefacts in the Port Arthur lab

This post originally featured on ArchSoc’s blog @ www.flindersarchsoc.com

Archaeology staff voted in top ten at Flinders in nation-wide poll

It was no surprise to Flinders students to find that two staff members in the Department of Archaeology graduate programs were in the top ten at Flinders in the “Lecturer of the Year” awards. Dr Alice Gorman was ranked first at Flinders, with Associate Professor Heather Burke at eighth position across the entire university.

For the last four years, UniJobs in collaboration with Campus Daily have conducted the poll to find Australia’s best lecturers, as voted by students. This year was the biggest yet, with more than 72 000 votes cast.

“It’s so nice to feel that our students appreciate what we do” said Dr Gorman. “I would like to thank everyone who voted for us – it is a real honour”.

Both Dr Gorman and Dr Burke, as well as Professor Claire Smith, were in the top 50 in the 2007 Lecturer of the Year awards.

“I think this says a lot about the effectiveness of the Graduate Programs in Archaeology and Cultural Heritage Management – we must be doing something right!” Dr Gorman commented.

Flinders Archaeology Photographic Scale Competition Winner!

Snap … Snap … Snap

Wow – All you guys sure have been busy!

A great range of archaeological shots were emailed into our Departmental Photographic Scale Competition and wow – we were very impressed!

It’s great to see that our international field schools excite you all and that your photos show this!

So, it makes sense that most of the photos sent in came from recent Flinders Archaeology field schools and field work – like; ARCH8516 Advanced Field School to Chile, the ARCH3306/ARCH8306 Burra Field School and the ARCH8109B Advanced Maritime Practicum in Saipan.

Great to also see that some shots came in from a few consulting archaeologists.

But with every competition, there always has to be a winner. So … congratulations go to Elizabeth Hartnell.

Her winning shot was taken whilst in the field at Plumbago Station, northern South Australia.

Just remember, when taking an archaeological photo you should:

- Keep the feature in focus.
– Keep the scale in focus when taking close ups.
– When using a photographic scale, ensure that the whole scale is within the frame.
– Keep the horizon level.
– Use a clean and tidy photographic scale.
– Preserve the site … don’t stick or poke your scale and/or camera just anywhere!

Keep snapping away and if you have any questions about artefact and site photography, come in and see the Archaeology Technical Officers (SSS143).

Dr Lynley Wallis honoured with prestigious teaching award


Our very own Lynley Wallis received an award from the Australian Learning and Teaching Council on Monday 3rd August, for “leadership and innovation in developing an outstanding graduate training programme in archaeology and cultural heritage management to produce industry-ready graduates.

Since joining the Department of Archaeology at Flinders University in 2005, Dr Wallis has been a dedicated teacher who captures the interest and imagination of students through her enthusiasm and passion for her discipline. She has been instrumental in creating a unique training program that has proven conclusively to be the leading provider of graduate education in these fields nationally, effecting a paradigm shift in the ways archaeology is taught in Australia”.

Congratulations, Lynley!

(Quote taken from Lynley’s citation).

Spear Throwers

Thanks to all who arrived with enthusiasm at the Graduate Programs in Archaeology and CHM presentation night on Friday. With plenty of food and drink, the night went off without any problems and knowledge was to be gained by all. The presentations were all different in topics which made the night more interesting. The questions were not as scary as they could have been and some intriguing concepts were presented. The idea of weight balanced spear throwers is something I had not considered, and as suggested, some places have harsher environments that require specific use of the spear thrower. I felt form was a good way of comparing the adult ones to the toys as I previously had no knowledge of spear throwers and thought there may have been differences. There is not. In fact, the whole process was rewarding as I had no knowledge of Indigenous children and play, nor on spear throwers. Thanks to my fellow directed study peers, Alice Gorman and Dr Keryn Walshe.