Tag Archives: Our Achievements

Flinders graduates present at the University of the Third Age

On Friday 8th May, two Flinders masters students, Emmily Bower and Georgina Ashley, presented talks on their 2008 Directed Studies projects to students at the University of the Third Age in Adelaide.

U3A is a voluntary organisation for people who are retired, where members share their knowledge with each other. The Adelaide programme is organised by Sue Lea.

Georgie spoke about her research into the influential – and often controversial – Kingston family, who played a large role in the development of South Australia. She completed the study for the Friends of Kingston House, the family home of the Kingstons. The audience was alternatively amused and horrified by the tales of horse-whippings, nose-twistings, duels and extramarital shenanigans that were a feature of this turbulent family.

Emily presented the results of her research into the Maesbury Cemetery, where Dr Lynley Wallis has been conducting a project in collaboration with the Norwood-Payneham-St Peters council. All the headstones were removed when the cemetery was redeveloped into a park, and with only minimal records kept, the task of reconstructing the lives of this small community is a challenging one! As well as researching three families represented in the cemetery, Emily investigated health issues leading to high infant morality rates in the 19th century.

The audience of U3Aers was very appreciative, and expressed the hope that more Flinders archaeology and CHM graduates would participate in the programme! We are looking forward to a fruitful collaboration with the U3A.

Graduate students at the awards ceremony, Friday 27th February


Amirul Affifudin, runner-up for the Australian Cultural Heritage Management Graduate Prize, receives his award from Dave Mott, Director of ACHM.


Michael Field looks slightly surprised as he receives the Excellence in Field Practice Prize from Dr Lynley Wallis.


Rui Laranjeira accepting the Graduate Program Staff Encouragement Prize from the winged Dr Alice Gorman


Kylie Lower, runner-up for the Graduate Student Archaeology Prize, beams as she shakes Dr Heather Burke’s hand.


But wait, there’s more! Clare von Maltzahn receives the Graduate Student Archaeology Prize from Dr Heather Burke.

And finally – Jenna Randell, the recipient of the ACHM Graduate Student Cultural Heritage Management Prize, makes Dave Mott blush with pride.

Photographs courtesy of Debra Robertson and James Bateman

Graduate students receive recognition for their outstanding work

On Friday the 27th of February, a number of Flinders University students in the Graduate Programmes in Archaeology and Cultural Heritage Management received awards for their achievements. The ceremony was attended by staff, students, family, friends, the Executive Dean of Education, Theology, Humanities and Law Professor Faith Trent AM, the Dean of the School of Humanities Professor Graham Tulloch, and a number of our Industry Partners (Collections Council of Australia, Comber Consultants, Australian Cultural Heritage Management, the Cultural Heritage Branch of Aboriginal Affairs and Reconciliation). The Flinders University Archaeology Society put on an excellent BBQ, ably assisted by Academic Administrator Kitty Sutcliffe, and a good time was had by all!

Award winners were:
Kellie Clayton – The Ecophyte Technologies Archaeological Geophysics Prize
Amirul Affifudin – Runner up, Australian Cultural Heritage Management Graduate Prize
Emily Bower – Runner up, Australian Cultural Heritage Management Graduate Prize
Michael Field – Excellence in Field Practice Prize
Rui Laranjeira – Graduate Program Staff Encouragement Prize
Clare von Maltzahn – Graduate Student Archaeology Prize
Kylie Lower – Runner up, Graduate Student Archaeology Prize
Jenna Randell – The ACHM Graduate Student Cultural Heritage Management Prize

The Department would like thank Australian Cultural Heritage Management and Ecophyte Technologies for their generous sponsorship of graduate prizes.

Stay tuned for photographs of the event.