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Maritime Archaeology Field Practicum 2014 Day Four

Gold Coast Wreck Conservation Project – Maritime Archaeology Field Practicum.

Today we visited the beach at Coolangatta Creek where the shipwreck was recovered in 1974 to undertake a magnetometer survey (Figure 1) and metal detector survey (Figure 2) of this area. Guests from Cosmos Archaeology, Cos Coroneos, Danielle Wilkinson, and Gina Scheer, came along for the day to help investigate the site.

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Figure 1: Danielle, Cos, Dana and Kate undertaking the magnetometer survey (Photo Gina Scheer 2014).

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Figure 2: Trevor, Amelia and Kate completing the metal detector survey in Coolangatta Creek (Photo Gina Scheer 2014).

 After setting up the grid from the magnetometer survey (Figure 3 and 4) the team split with a group returning to Queen Elizabeth Park, Coolangatta to continue recording the shipwreck remains. Detailed drawings (Figure 5), timber recording forms (Figure 5) and timber samples (Figure 6) were taken.

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Figure 3: Toni and Amelia setting up the grid at Coolangatta Creek (Photo Lauren Davison 2014).

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Figure 4: Dana, Trevor and Danielle setting up grid at Coolangatta Creek (Photo Lauren Davison 2014).

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Figure 5: Mark, Toni and Jane doing a detailed drawing and Brad completing a timber recording form (Photo Lauren Davison 2014).

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Figure 6: Brad, Mark, Lauren and Jane taking timber samples (Photo Toni Massey 2014).

Maritime Archaeology Field Practicum 2014 Day Three

Gold Coast Wreck Conservation Project – Maritime Archaeology Field Practicum.

Today was the third day of work, or the middle of our field practicum and we recorded another section of shipwreck, this time at the Gold Coast and Hinterland Historical Society, Bundall. The shipwreck remains are part of a sculpture (Figure 1 & 2) constructed from what was thought to be Coolangatta. The work today would not have been possible without access to the remains provided by the Gold Coast and Hinterland Historical Society and help from president John Burns and volunteer Bob Nancarrow.

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Figure 1: The team in front of sculpture at the Gold Coast and Hinterland Historical Society (Photo Kate Greenwood 2014).

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Figure 2: Sculpture of shipwreck material (Photo Wendy van Duivenvoorde 2014).

Timber recording forms and photographs of the ten individual elements (both planking and frames) were used to record the remains (Figure 3) before samples were taken (Figure 4) and tracings and scale drawings (Figure 5) completed.

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Figure 3: Lauren Davison recording a frame fragment (Photo Toni Massey 2014).

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Figure 4: Wendy van Duienvoorde and Paddy Waterson taking timber samples (Photo Toni Massey 2014).

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Figure 5: Brad Guadagnin and Trevor Winton undertaking a scale drawing of Frame 2 (Photo Wendy 2014).

Completed at the same time as the shipwreck recording, with the help of Ashley Parker, was the entering of the shipwrecks artefacts at the historical society into a database, the Queensland Historic Shipwreck Relics Project, designed by Ashley himself to complete a register of the shipwreck artefacts at Bundall.

Maritime Archaeology Field Practicum 2014 Day Two

Gold Coast Wreck Conservation Project – Maritime Archaeology Field Practicum

Day two and we headed to Queen Elizabeth Park, Coolangatta to record an intact section of the shipwreck recovered in 1974 containing a wale, three hull planks, frames, fasteners and sheathing (Figure 1).

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Figure 1: Kevin Rains, Jane Austen, Wendy van Duivenvoorde, Peta Fray, Amelia MacArthur Lacey, Dana Gilmore with the intact section in Queen Elizabeth Park, Coolangatta (Photo Lauren Davison 2014).

Overall pictures and detailed photos of individual features were completed (Figure 2) and a scale drawing of the shipwreck section was completed using baseline offset survey (Figure 3). Patent marks were found on the sheathing with these features being recorded through rubbings (Figure 4) and photographs. Tracings were also taken of the sheathing and upper planks to find patterns in the holes (Figure 5).

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Figure 2: Kate Greenwood photographing the back of the section (Photo Lauren Davison 2014).

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Figure 3: Peta Fray and Lauren Davison baseline offset survey (Photo Toni Massey 2014).

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Figure 4: Dana Gilmore taking rubbings of the patent marks (Photo Lauren Davison 2014).

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Figure 5: Dana Gilmore and Kate Greenwood tracing copper sheathing and Brad Guadagnin, Peta Fray and Lauren Davison baseline offset survey (Photo Toni Massey 2014).

A slight change in staff for the afternoon. Paddy, Kate and Dana went to the Tweed Heads Historical Museum for historical research while Mark joined the group in Queen Elizabeth Park. Activities were similar to the morning with the scale drawing, tracing of timbers with the addition of recording the frames and fasteners undertaken by Mark and Brad (Figure 6).

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Figure 6: Brad Guadagnin and Mark Polzer recording frames (Photo Lauren Davison 2014).

The day ended with Trevor Winton from Jacobs Consulting and MAAWA joining us to help for the rest of the week.

Maritime Archaeology Field Practicum 2014

Gold Coast Wreck Conservation Project – Maritime Archaeology Field Practicum.

The Maritime Archaeology Field Practicum for 2014 is taking place on the Gold Coast, Queensland, where five students – Brad Guadagnin, Kate Greenwood, Peta Fray, Dana Gilmore and Lauren Davison – and two Flinders staff members, Wendy van Duivenvoorde and Mark Polzer (along with assistance from baby Isabelle), are recording and investigating a section of a shipwreck recovered in 1974. While popularly believed to be Coolangatta that wrecked in 1846, it has also been suggested that the remains are Heroine which wrecked in 1897.

Day one consisted of the usual introductory meeting and site induction where we met our partners from the Department of Environment and Heritage Protection, Paddy Waterson, Amelia MacArthur Lacey and Toni Massey, and the Gold Coast City Council (GCCC), Kevin Rains and Jane Austen without whom this field practicum would not be possible.

A trip to the GCCC Depot was the order of the afternoon where we were given access to shipwreck remains which included frames, planking, anchors, and fasteners (Figure 1). Once familiar with the remains we soon got to work undertaking baseline offset survey (Figure 2), photography, and anchor recording (Figure 3).

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Figure 1: Shipwreck remains at the Gold Coast City Council Depot (Photo Lauren Davison 2014).

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Figure 2: Brad Guadagnin and Toni Massey undertaking Baseline offset survey (Photo Lauren Davison 2014).

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Figure 3: Recording anchors at GCCC Depot, Wendy van Duivenvoorde and Dana Gilmore (Photo Lauren Davison 2014).

Site Delineation with an Underwater Metal Detector

by Hunter Brendel, Master of Maritime Archaeology student

It is a certain fact that all field archaeologists are aware of – equipment does not always behave the way you want it to. Yet when it doesn’t, the opportunity for “McGuiverism” is there. During the Flinders 2013 field school at Port MacDonnell, we had certain technical issues with the magnetometer we were using. Luckily for us, the staff came prepared with underwater metal detectors. By using metal detectors, we were able to conduct transect surveys to delineate a possible shipwreck site on shore (Figure 1). Students used the metal detectors to detect pings that were then marked on a survey plan.

Figure 1. Myself (left) and fellow student Chelsea Colwell-Pasch (right) conducting a metal detector survey on shore during the 2013 Flinders University Maritime Archaeology field school.

Figure 1. Myself (left) and fellow student Chelsea Colwell-Pasch (right) conducting a metal detector survey on shore during the 2013 Flinders University Maritime Archaeology field school.

Later on, we used the same transect method to delineate our shipwreck, Hawthorn, which was located approximately 10 meters off shore. Since the wreck was in the surf, we students were able to replicate the transect survey techniques used on land by snorkeling and marking pings on a Mylar survey plan slate. All we needed to do was give a thumbs up every time we heard a ping, and our dive buddy was there to mark where the ping came from. Two other students held down the transect line and moved it every time we cleared a lap. Simple enough, yet effective in practice.

The Lighthouse Archeological Maritime Program (LAMP) devised a similar strategy for their 2014 Storm Wreck field season after experiencing magnetometer issues themselves. Brian McNamara, a fellow 2013 Flinders field school student and LAMP archaeologist, devised a plan to use a metal detector to delineate the Storm Wreck site. Only this time was different. Site conditions such as an eight meter depth of the site, poor visibility (really poor visibility), and chance for swells were unlike those we experienced in South Australia. Not to mention it had to be done on SCUBA.

So we hit the drawing board and came up with a plan to delineate the Storm Wreck site by using an underwater metal detector. I was to carry out the trial run by delineating a 10×10 meter area south of the Storm Wreck site (Figure 2). Listed are the materials we needed to SCUBA with to effectively carry out the underwater detector survey:

  1. A ten meter polypropylene transect line with every meter marked with a zip tie. At the five meter mark was a looped zip tie.
  2. Two fiberglass rods.
  3. Measuring tape.
  4. Down line with a diver flag attached to a buoy.
  5. A mushroom anchor to hold the down line and western end of the transect line.
  6. A weight belt and weights to hold the the eastern end of the transect line.
  7. Underwater metal detector.
  8. Mylar slate and pencils (lots of pencils) for a survey plan.
  9. SCUBA gear, cylinder, compass, etc.

First, my student dive buddy and I brought with us a mushroom anchor and down line with a diver flag attached to a buoy. Then we swam to a screw anchor that held southern end of the baseline in place. At the screw anchor, my student dive buddy held the middle loop of the polypropylene transect line in place. I swam east, end of the transect line in-hand, to stretch out the transect line, which I tied to the weight belt so that it was secure. I inserted one of the fiberglass rods through the weight belt as a reference marker. Using my compass, I ensured that the line was on an east-west, or 180 degree, bearing. I swam back to my dive buddy, stretched out the other half of the transect line, secured it to the mushroom anchor, and used my compass to make sure the east-west bearing was still accurate. I then planted the other fiberglass rod through the mushroom anchor.

Now the survey could start.

My dive buddy and I swam east-west along the ten meter transect line with the underwater metal detector in hand. Covering two meters to north and south of the transect line with the metal detector, we would pick up pings and then mark their location on the Mylar survey plan slate. As the designated metal detector holder (aka “Wielder of Truth”), I would tap my dive buddy’s mask every time I heard a ping and my dive buddy would mark its location on the slate. After we cleared the ten meter transect line, we would measure and move the line two meters south and repeat the survey. When five survey tracts were completed, we would have covered a 10×10 meter area south of the site.

Believe it or not, the metal detector survey to delineate the Storm Wreck was a resounding success. All students and supervisors had an opportunity to conduct the survey around the northern, eastern, western, and southern periphery of the Storm Wreck site. LAMP staff hope to superimpose the results of the survey on an up-to-date site plan of the wreck. Piece of cake.

Figure 2. “Trust me, I’m an archaeologist.”

Figure 2. “Trust me, I’m an archaeologist.”