Category Archives: Posts from the field

Posts about fieldwork

To continue my Pilbara blog

It is hot….for those who have read my previous blog and noted my brag about the luxurious life we live in while at the mine, well I take it all back. We have had on average throughout October temperatures of 36-38 degrees. I live in dread of what the temperatures will be like by February. To make matters worse, next week I am off to a mine near Marble Bar – noted for its record of 161 days straight where the temperature did not drop below 37.8 degrees.

While there, we will be undertaking a survey in quite steep hills so I am hoping that I get the opportunity to record a rock shelter, something I have not yet done. Through this job, I have gained quite a bit of experience with recording artefact scatters, quarries, reduction areas, gringing patches and scarred trees, I have come a long way since I started 4 months ago with no Indigenous archaeology experience. I have also gained significant experience writing CHM reports, mapping, site recording, using a GPS, surveying and 4 Wheel Driving.

When considering this type of job for a career I would suggest the following as essential requirements: sense of humor, able to work as part of a team, adaptability, good physical fitness and above all the ability to work under pressure. If anyone is interested, there are HEAPS of jobs here in WA, send out your resumes and cold canvas.

Masters Thesis: Fieldwork at Tirringie 09

FAST FACTS:
Who: A mish-mash of archaeology students and supervisors, both home-grown and interstate recruits
What: 10 windblown days of surveying, excavating, sieving, sorting, analysing, recording, examining, interpreting
Where: Tirringie, about 45 km from Meningie in the Coorong, Lower Lakes and Murray River region of South Australia
When: 15-25 February 2009

In mid-February 09, a group of intrepid archaeologists (and archaeologists-in-training) braved the harsh and often-gruelling conditions (aka home-made cookies, spa baths and trashy tv shows) to spend 2 weeks at the Coorong working with Ngarrindjeri community members to survey, record, excavation, investigate and rehabilitate a culturally important Old People’s burial site. Continue reading