Category Archives: Department Announcements

Announcements by the Department of Archaeology

Society for Underwater Historical Archaeology lecture and AGM

Society For Underwater Historical Research presents:

Peter Christopher talking about Australian Shipwrecks

Where: The Box Factory Community Centre, Adelaide, on Friday 19th November from 6.30 pm.

Everyone welcome!

And…

SUHR’s AGM and Christmas Party (and a sad farewell to Sam Bell and Matt Hanks!)

Where: The Box Factory community Centre on Monday 6th December from 6 pm.

We look forward to seeing everyone at the lecture and AGM!

Drinks and light refreshment will be provided.

For more information contact
Toni Massey
SUHR President

temassey@hotmail.com

Flinders Archaeology Photographic Scale Competition Winner!

Snap … Snap … Snap

Wow – All you guys sure have been busy!

A great range of archaeological shots were emailed into our Departmental Photographic Scale Competition and wow – we were very impressed!

It’s great to see that our international field schools excite you all and that your photos show this!

So, it makes sense that most of the photos sent in came from recent Flinders Archaeology field schools and field work – like; ARCH8516 Advanced Field School to Chile, the ARCH3306/ARCH8306 Burra Field School and the ARCH8109B Advanced Maritime Practicum in Saipan.

Great to also see that some shots came in from a few consulting archaeologists.

But with every competition, there always has to be a winner. So … congratulations go to Elizabeth Hartnell.

Her winning shot was taken whilst in the field at Plumbago Station, northern South Australia.

Just remember, when taking an archaeological photo you should:

- Keep the feature in focus.
– Keep the scale in focus when taking close ups.
– When using a photographic scale, ensure that the whole scale is within the frame.
– Keep the horizon level.
– Use a clean and tidy photographic scale.
– Preserve the site … don’t stick or poke your scale and/or camera just anywhere!

Keep snapping away and if you have any questions about artefact and site photography, come in and see the Archaeology Technical Officers (SSS143).

Honours theses 2010 – the big day!

John Hayward:  the crowning moment.

On Monday 25th October, Heidi Pitman and John Hayward had the usual run of printing problems, lack of sleep and stress to get their honours theses to the department on time.  John’s thesis was an analysis of the concept of the “toolkit” in Australian lithics, using collections in the South Australian Museum, while Heidi investigated the use of spinifex resin through ethnography and museum collections.  Congratulations to both of them!  Expect to see their abstracts in Australian Archaeology soon, and when examination is complete, the theses will be available on the Flinders University Department of Archaeology website.

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ARCH8307 “Introductory Archaeological Geophysics” 2010



Thank you to all of my intrepid students who finish up their ARCH8307 “Introductory Archaeological Geophysics” topic this afternoon by presenting the data they have collected from the historic Meadows Wesleyan cemetery in the Adelaide Hills. The students, split in two groups entitled “The A Team” and “The Sextons”, collected, processed and interpreted ground penetrating radar, electromagnetic induction and magnetometer data to try to locate the foundations of the former church and some of the more than 50 unmarked burials know the exist within this cemetery. Students also were fortunate to be able to assist Flinders PhD candidate Martin Wimmer by searching for an air raid shelter in Souter Park, Goodwood. The investigations are still a bit inconclusive, but our preliminary interpretation is that a feature did exist on this site however any material used for it’s construction has now been removed.

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A day at the museum: ARCH8517 visit the South Australian Museum’s lithic stores

Dr Keryn Walshe explains a tool to Jon, Veronica, Matthew and Adi

On August 24th, the ARCH8517 class visited the South Australian Museum’s storage facility in Hindmarsh.  We looked at Gallus’ lithic collections from Koonalda Cave; and a box of material shipped by Norman Tindale from the US when he returned.  Dr Keryn Walshe explained different aspects of the collections, and showed the class a range of classic tool types.  Then, working in pairs, students looked at small collections donated to the museum by various people known and unknown.  Using both geological and typological reference collections, and the sparse and sometimes curious information that accompanied the artefacts, they had to identify the raw materials, technology and typology.

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