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Society for Underwater Historical Archaeology lecture and AGM

Society For Underwater Historical Research presents:

Peter Christopher talking about Australian Shipwrecks

Where: The Box Factory Community Centre, Adelaide, on Friday 19th November from 6.30 pm.

Everyone welcome!

And…

SUHR’s AGM and Christmas Party (and a sad farewell to Sam Bell and Matt Hanks!)

Where: The Box Factory community Centre on Monday 6th December from 6 pm.

We look forward to seeing everyone at the lecture and AGM!

Drinks and light refreshment will be provided.

For more information contact
Toni Massey
SUHR President

temassey@hotmail.com

Flinders Archaeology Photographic Scale Competition Winner!

Snap … Snap … Snap

Wow – All you guys sure have been busy!

A great range of archaeological shots were emailed into our Departmental Photographic Scale Competition and wow – we were very impressed!

It’s great to see that our international field schools excite you all and that your photos show this!

So, it makes sense that most of the photos sent in came from recent Flinders Archaeology field schools and field work – like; ARCH8516 Advanced Field School to Chile, the ARCH3306/ARCH8306 Burra Field School and the ARCH8109B Advanced Maritime Practicum in Saipan.

Great to also see that some shots came in from a few consulting archaeologists.

But with every competition, there always has to be a winner. So … congratulations go to Elizabeth Hartnell.

Her winning shot was taken whilst in the field at Plumbago Station, northern South Australia.

Just remember, when taking an archaeological photo you should:

- Keep the feature in focus.
- Keep the scale in focus when taking close ups.
- When using a photographic scale, ensure that the whole scale is within the frame.
- Keep the horizon level.
- Use a clean and tidy photographic scale.
- Preserve the site … don’t stick or poke your scale and/or camera just anywhere!

Keep snapping away and if you have any questions about artefact and site photography, come in and see the Archaeology Technical Officers (SSS143).

Directed Study: SANTS Artefact Collection – Background and Repatriation

Hi guys. My directed study on this SANTS Collection has been focused quite a lot on repatriation and what options might be possible. To look into this I’ve done a bit of research into the situation of cultural material repatriation in Australia broadly and more specifically at South Australia. This is opposed to the repatriation of human remains which seems to have considerably more literature and attention. I have found Rachel Lenehan’s 1995 thesis on this topic of cultural material repatriation to be very helpful and interesting. I have considered an updated version (taking in the last 15 years) to be a possible thesis opportunity for myself.

I have included a short history on archaeology in Australia and its connection with indigenous communities and the paradigm shift towards community participation and a respect for other people’s cultural property. This history includes issues that have been raised for and against repatriation. As for the SANTS Collection, there are a few options available.

In my background research on cultural material repatriation I have looked at certain institutions and how they have behaved over time in particular repatriation instances. In particular I have looked at the Tasmanian Aboriginal Land Council (TALC) versus La Trobe, The Australian Museum and the South Australian Museum.

Archaeology of Australian Stone Tools practical test

No, it wasn’t an exam, it was an in-class test …… but still, graduate students in ARCH8517 The Archaeology of Australian Stone Artefacts had to have their lithic thinking caps on, to identify and record the key features of a set of previously unseen artefacts last week for the final class in this topic.  An unofficial part of the test was to compose a limerick on the subject of lithics (not marked of course).  Here are some highlights.

From left to right:  Teagan Miller, Adi Saunders, Clare von Maltzahn and Claire Keating

Honours theses 2010 – the big day!

John Hayward:  the crowning moment.

On Monday 25th October, Heidi Pitman and John Hayward had the usual run of printing problems, lack of sleep and stress to get their honours theses to the department on time.  John’s thesis was an analysis of the concept of the “toolkit” in Australian lithics, using collections in the South Australian Museum, while Heidi investigated the use of spinifex resin through ethnography and museum collections.  Congratulations to both of them!  Expect to see their abstracts in Australian Archaeology soon, and when examination is complete, the theses will be available on the Flinders University Department of Archaeology website.

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