Author Archives: fuadwebmaster

Executive summary of my directed study project

I have just concluded my directed study project which was focused on researching a new methodology for the indirect detection of unmarked burial sites using ground penetrating radar. Being responsible for researching and writing up a larger sized project, and drawing on various sources for literature including interstate collections has been a valuable learning experience. However the most rewarding experience has been the opportunity to be involved in undertaking research with important implications for locating the burial location of a significant Indigenous historical figure.

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Masters Thesis Abstract: Gendered spaces, Public places

Gender-exclusive organisations are ubiquitous in the Australian social landscape, coming in all forms, shapes and sizes. The potential for such organisations, however, to inform us about past gender roles and attitudes has not been addressed within the Australian context. The aim of this thesis, therefore, is to investigate what the buildings of such organisations can reveal about the roles of men and women in the past.

Buildings belonging to the Freemasons and the Country Women’s Association in rural South Australia formed the basis for this investigation. Archaeological research was carried out to record the social, geographic, physical and functional attributes of buildings in order to identify trends occurring between and amongst buildings used exclusively by men and women. Attributes included street type, building size, visibility, decorative features, internal layout, alterations and use.

While CWA buildings remained relatively unchanged throughout the study period (1836-2010), the results for Masonic buildings showed that there were significant changes occurring, particularly regarding the use of external decorative features and the presence of amenities. Style, as a form of non-verbal communication, is used to reflect and reinforce prevailing ideology. The changing style of Masonic and CWA buildings suggest a shift in gender roles and attitudes, from the ‘traditional’ separate spheres ideology of pre-WWII, to the more ‘egalitarian’ worldview post-war. This thesis concludes that social changes occurring as a result of World War II are reflected in the design, location and construction of gender-exclusive buildings, most notably those belonging to the Freemasons.

Masters Thesis, World Heritage Site Interpretation

Having moments ago finished the stressful process of writing my masters thesis I felt compelled to post my abstract here for everyone to read before rushing to the library to read the full version, lol. Enjoy :D, Olly.

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Society for Underwater Historical Archaeology lecture and AGM

Society For Underwater Historical Research presents:

Peter Christopher talking about Australian Shipwrecks

Where: The Box Factory Community Centre, Adelaide, on Friday 19th November from 6.30 pm.

Everyone welcome!

And…

SUHR’s AGM and Christmas Party (and a sad farewell to Sam Bell and Matt Hanks!)

Where: The Box Factory community Centre on Monday 6th December from 6 pm.

We look forward to seeing everyone at the lecture and AGM!

Drinks and light refreshment will be provided.

For more information contact
Toni Massey
SUHR President

temassey@hotmail.com

Flinders Archaeology Photographic Scale Competition Winner!

Snap … Snap … Snap

Wow – All you guys sure have been busy!

A great range of archaeological shots were emailed into our Departmental Photographic Scale Competition and wow – we were very impressed!

It’s great to see that our international field schools excite you all and that your photos show this!

So, it makes sense that most of the photos sent in came from recent Flinders Archaeology field schools and field work – like; ARCH8516 Advanced Field School to Chile, the ARCH3306/ARCH8306 Burra Field School and the ARCH8109B Advanced Maritime Practicum in Saipan.

Great to also see that some shots came in from a few consulting archaeologists.

But with every competition, there always has to be a winner. So … congratulations go to Elizabeth Hartnell.

Her winning shot was taken whilst in the field at Plumbago Station, northern South Australia.

Just remember, when taking an archaeological photo you should:

- Keep the feature in focus.
– Keep the scale in focus when taking close ups.
– When using a photographic scale, ensure that the whole scale is within the frame.
– Keep the horizon level.
– Use a clean and tidy photographic scale.
– Preserve the site … don’t stick or poke your scale and/or camera just anywhere!

Keep snapping away and if you have any questions about artefact and site photography, come in and see the Archaeology Technical Officers (SSS143).

Directed Study: SANTS Artefact Collection – Background and Repatriation

Hi guys. My directed study on this SANTS Collection has been focused quite a lot on repatriation and what options might be possible. To look into this I’ve done a bit of research into the situation of cultural material repatriation in Australia broadly and more specifically at South Australia. This is opposed to the repatriation of human remains which seems to have considerably more literature and attention. I have found Rachel Lenehan’s 1995 thesis on this topic of cultural material repatriation to be very helpful and interesting. I have considered an updated version (taking in the last 15 years) to be a possible thesis opportunity for myself.

I have included a short history on archaeology in Australia and its connection with indigenous communities and the paradigm shift towards community participation and a respect for other people’s cultural property. This history includes issues that have been raised for and against repatriation. As for the SANTS Collection, there are a few options available.

In my background research on cultural material repatriation I have looked at certain institutions and how they have behaved over time in particular repatriation instances. In particular I have looked at the Tasmanian Aboriginal Land Council (TALC) versus La Trobe, The Australian Museum and the South Australian Museum.

Archaeology of Australian Stone Tools practical test

No, it wasn’t an exam, it was an in-class test …… but still, graduate students in ARCH8517 The Archaeology of Australian Stone Artefacts had to have their lithic thinking caps on, to identify and record the key features of a set of previously unseen artefacts last week for the final class in this topic.  An unofficial part of the test was to compose a limerick on the subject of lithics (not marked of course).  Here are some highlights.

From left to right:  Teagan Miller, Adi Saunders, Clare von Maltzahn and Claire Keating